stress

Enhance your Email

Enhance your Email

A feeling many of us know too well is the sinking feeling that accompanies a growing number of unread emails. Checking your inbox after a vacation, the weekend, or even an afternoon meeting can quickly add up to be a big pile of to-dos. Staying organized can help reduce stress and keep us mentally healthy and productive.

Collaborative Burnout and Mental Health

Collaborative Burnout and Mental Health

Do you ever find yourself leaving the office at the end of the day with the feeling that you got nothing done? Does the passing of time in the workplace surprise you? Do you feel that your workday is full obligations like meetings and other communications that prevent you from getting your work done?

Spring Cleaning for Your Home, Workspace, and Mind

Spring Cleaning for Your Home, Workspace, and Mind

As the warm weather is approaching, we may be dreading that one daunting task that calls our name in the midst of April showers and blooming flowers ... that is spring cleaning! However, what you may not know is that all of that dusting, scrubbing, and roll-up-your sleeves worthy activity can serve us twofold. While spring cleaning has the obvious benefits of a tidied closet, a sparkling counter top, and open desk spaces, more importantly, it has been associated with improved mood, decreased stress and heightened creativity (Psychology Today, 2015). Let's face it, spring cleaning doesn’t just look good, it feels good.

Sticking to the Basics

Sticking to the Basics

Are you having a bad day at work? Bad week? Feeling sad? Overwhelmed? Anxious? Regretful? Want to regenerate for 2016? Well, you are not alone! Sometimes we feel all of these things and need a quick way of resetting our minds to get us through. Doctor Mike Evans, doctor/professor at St. Michael’s Hospital and the University of Toronto calls this “get through the day” or “get through the week” advice. As part of his video lecture series on mental health, Dr. Evans suggests that we gear down and stick to the basics.

When it's okay to cry at work (and when it isn't)

When it's okay to cry at work (and when it isn't)

Some of the world’s most powerful leaders do it.

We all know the workplace isn’t the place to cry. But sometimes it just happens.

There is a long held belief that crying at work is unprofessional and detrimental to one’s career, that it is a sign of weakness, emotional instability, and the person can’t handle the job. 

Millennial Mental Health

Millennial Mental Health

“Lazy”. “Cry babies”. “Technology-dependent”. “Entitled”. “Self-absorbed”. Millennials (also known as Generation Y) have been on the receiving end of these criticisms too often. For those of you belonging to Generation Y, these erroneous generalizations may unfortunately ring a bell.

Catch some ZZz's: Well rested employees are productive employees

Catch some ZZz's: Well rested employees are productive employees

Are you experiencing any of the following? 

  • Exhaustion
  • Impulsivity
  • Forgetfulness
  • Trouble making decisions
  • Slower reaction time
  • Trouble concentrating

 If yes, you may be experiencing sleep-deprivation and its time to take a nap!

“Booster Breaks”: A New Type of Work Break

“Booster Breaks”: A New Type of Work Break

THE ESSENTIAL COFFEE BREAK

We have all taken that 15 minute coffee break in the middle of our day, hoping that our newly caffeinated selves will survive the afternoon. It is no surprise that coffee is the most consumed beverage in Canada, with over 14 billion cups consumed annually (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 2010). The popularity of coffee has made coffee breaks an integral component of workplace culture.  Unfortunately, traditional work breaks such as coffee and smoking work breaks are often used in an attempt to combat work-related stress and inactivity (Taylor, 2005). Since work breaks occur so routinely, what happens during these times can significantly affect overall public health....

What We Can Learn From Chickens

What We Can Learn From Chickens

In her recent TED talk, Margaret Heffernan, an entrepreneur, former CEO of five companies and an author, discussed an experiment on productivity by evolutionary biologist, William Muir, at Purdue University. Muir was interested in productivity--- which is something that concerns all of us—devised a beautiful experiment to increase egg production in chickens.  He first selected the most productive hen—the one that laid the largest number of eggs within each cage to breed the next generation of hens. In other words, he identified the “star” employee. Then, he took the star egg layers and put them together in one cage and tried to breed from this group of best in cage winners—like an NHL hockey team.